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Monday, 30 November 2020 00:00

Shin splints, also known as medial tibial stress syndrome, refers to the inflammation of bone tissue, tendons, and muscles around the tibia or shinbone. Shin splints tend to affect athletes, often developing after strenuous physical activity or upon beginning a new fitness program. The main symptom of a shin splint is leg pain. The pain typically begins gradually and may be accompanied by muscle aches. Over time, the leg pain may worsen, eventually leading to shooting pains, tenderness, and swelling. Bruises and small lumps may also begin to appear on the shin. If you suspect that you have shin splints, it is suggested that you seek the care of a podiatrist, who can diagnose and treat this condition.

Sports related foot and ankle injuries require proper treatment before players can go back to their regular routines. For more information, contact Jeannette Velazquez, DPM of Bare Foot Care Specialist. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Sports Related Foot and Ankle Injuries

Foot and ankle injuries are a common occurrence when it comes to athletes of any sport. While many athletes dismiss the initial aches and pains, the truth is that ignoring potential foot and ankle injuries can lead to serious problems. As athletes continue to place pressure and strain the area further, a mild injury can turn into something as serious as a rupture and may lead to a permanent disability. There are many factors that contribute to sports related foot and ankle injuries, which include failure to warm up properly, not providing support or wearing bad footwear. Common injuries and conditions athletes face, including:

  • Plantar Fasciitis
  • Plantar Fasciosis
  • Achilles Tendinitis
  • Achilles Tendon Rupture
  • Ankle Sprains

Sports related injuries are commonly treated using the RICE method. This includes rest, applying ice to the injured area, compression and elevating the ankle. More serious sprains and injuries may require surgery, which could include arthroscopic and reconstructive surgery. Rehabilitation and therapy may also be required in order to get any recovering athlete to become fully functional again. Any unusual aches and pains an athlete sustains must be evaluated by a licensed, reputable medical professional.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Flowery Branch, GA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 23 November 2020 00:00

Corns and calluses occur due to friction or pressure on the feet. While calluses are usually asymptomatic and cover a broader area of skin, corns are deeper, more focused and more painful. Corns are usually pea-sized, have a plug, and extend deep into the surface of the skin. Calluses tend to stay closer to the surface, without a plug. Treatment options for both include manual removal, cushioning the affected area, and adjusting biomechanics, such as changing your shoes. Patients who frequently have issues with corns and calluses should consult with a podiatrist for proper preventative measures and various treatment options.

If you have any concerns regarding your feet and ankles, contact Jeannette Velazquez, DPM of Bare Foot Care Specialist. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Corns: What Are They? and How Do You Get Rid of Them?
Corns can be described as areas of the skin that have thickened to the point of becoming painful or irritating. They are often layers and layers of the skin that have become dry and rough, and are normally smaller than calluses.

Ways to Prevent Corns
There are many ways to get rid of painful corns such as wearing:

  • Well-fitting socks
  • Comfortable shoes that are not tight around your foot
  • Shoes that offer support

Treating Corns
Treatment of corns involves removing the dead skin that has built up in the specific area of the foot. Consult with Our doctor to determine the best treatment option for your case of corns.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Flowery Branch, GA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 16 November 2020 00:00

There are several reasons why bunions may develop. These can include genetic factors, wearing shoes that do not fit correctly, a foot deformity, or from a medical condition like arthritis. A bunion is defined as a bone that protrudes from the joint in the big toe, and may cause severe pain and discomfort. Additional symptoms of a bunion can consist of swelling and redness surrounding the affected joint, and the toe may be difficult to move. After a proper diagnosis is made, which generally involves having an X-ray taken and a physical examination of the foot is performed, proper treatment can begin. Orthotics may be prescribed and it is beneficial to wear shoes that have low heels and a wide toe box. If your bunion is very painful or causing difficulty walking, it is strongly suggested that you are examined by a podiatrist.

If you are suffering from bunion pain, contact Jeannette Velazquez, DPM of Bare Foot Care Specialist. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is a Bunion?

Bunions are painful bony bumps that usually develop on the inside of the foot at the joint of the big toe. As the deformity increases over time, it may become painful to walk and wear shoes. Women are more likely to exacerbate existing bunions since they often wear tight, narrow shoes that shift their toes together. Bunion pain can be relieved by wearing wider shoes with enough room for the toes.

Causes

  • Genetics – some people inherit feet that are more prone to bunion development
  • Inflammatory Conditions - rheumatoid arthritis and polio may cause bunion development

Symptoms

  • Redness and inflammation
  • Pain and tenderness
  • Callus or corns on the bump
  • Restricted motion in the big toe

In order to diagnose your bunion, your podiatrist may ask about your medical history, symptoms, and general health. Your doctor might also order an x-ray to take a closer look at your feet. Nonsurgical treatment options include orthotics, padding, icing, changes in footwear, and medication. If nonsurgical treatments don’t alleviate your bunion pain, surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Flowery Branch, GA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Saturday, 14 November 2020 00:00

Have your child's feet been examined lately? Healthy feet are happy feet. If your child is complaining of foot pain, it may be a sign of underlying problems.

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